Onco Sciences

at Sterling Hospitals

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How can we help you?

The Centre of Excellence in Onco Sciences at Sterling Hospitals provides exceptional cancer care using advanced technology and a multidisciplinary approach. Our dedicated team of oncologists, surgeons, radiologists, and specialized healthcare professionals is committed to delivering comprehensive treatment for various types of cancer.

We offer a wide range of services, including medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation therapy, hematology, and specialized programs for breast, lung, gastrointestinal, urological, and gynecological cancers. Our state-of-the-art facilities, equipped with advanced imaging technologies, radiation therapy units, and modern operating rooms, ensure precise diagnosis and effective treatment.

Our focus on innovation drives us to swiftly adopt the latest treatment methodologies, improving patient outcomes. Central to our mission is patient-centered care, where we create personalized treatment plans tailored to each patient's unique needs, providing compassionate support throughout their cancer journey. The Centre of Excellence in Onco Sciences at Sterling Hospitals is dedicated to helping you achieve the best possible outcomes in cancer care.

Our Specialities

From routine check-ups to specialized treatments, our dedicated team of healthcare professionals offers personalized care to meet all your needs on your journey to wellness.

Our Doctors

Our physicians are committed to delivering personalized care tailored to your unique needs. From routine check-ups to complex procedures, trust in our compassionate experts to guide you on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

Areas of Expertise

Discover Unparalleled Expertise: Where Advanced Technology and Compassionate Care Meet to Deliver Exceptional Healthcare Services

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to destroy cancer cells or slow their growth. These drugs can be administered orally or intravenously and work by targeting rapidly dividing cells, which are characteristic of cancer cells. Chemotherapy may be used alone or in combination with other treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, or immunotherapy, depending on the type and stage of cancer.

When and why do people go for Chemotherapy?

People undergo chemotherapy for various reasons depending on their specific cancer diagnosis and treatment plan. Chemotherapy may be recommended as the primary treatment for certain types of cancer, such as leukaemia, lymphoma, or metastatic cancer, where surgery or radiation therapy may not be feasible. Additionally, chemotherapy may be used before surgery or radiation therapy to shrink tumours and make them easier to remove, or after surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells and reduce the risk of recurrence.

What makes Chemotherapy different from other treatment options?

Chemotherapy offers a unique treatment approach for cancer compared to other treatment options. While surgery and radiation therapy target localized tumours, chemotherapy works throughout the body to kill cancer cells that may have spread to other parts of the body. This systemic approach makes chemotherapy particularly effective for cancers that have metastasized or are difficult to remove surgically. Additionally, chemotherapy may be used in combination with other treatments to provide a comprehensive approach to cancer treatment and improve outcomes.

How does life change after Chemotherapy?

Life after chemotherapy can vary depending on the type of cancer, stage of treatment, and individual response to therapy. While chemotherapy may cause side effects such as fatigue, nausea, hair loss, and changes in appetite or mood during treatment, many of these side effects are temporary and improve once treatment is completed. However, for many cancer survivors, chemotherapy offers a chance for remission, improved quality of life, and a renewed appreciation for life after facing a cancer diagnosis. Support from healthcare providers, family, and support groups can play a crucial role in helping individuals navigate life after chemotherapy and adjust to the physical and emotional changes that may occur.

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Targeted Therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs or other substances to specifically identify and attack cancer cells while causing minimal damage to normal cells. Unlike traditional chemotherapy, which can affect both cancerous and healthy cells, targeted therapy works by targeting specific molecules or pathways that are involved in the growth and survival of cancer cells.

When and why do people go for Targeted Therapy?

People undergo targeted therapy for various types of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and melanoma, among others. Targeted therapy may be recommended when genetic mutations or specific biomarkers are present in the cancer cells that make them susceptible to targeted treatment. Additionally, targeted therapy may be used as a first-line treatment or in combination with other treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or immunotherapy to improve outcomes or reduce side effects.

What makes Targeted Therapy different from other treatment options?

Targeted therapy offers a more precise and tailored approach to cancer treatment compared to other options. While traditional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy affect all rapidly dividing cells, targeted therapy specifically targets cancer cells based on their unique molecular characteristics. This can lead to more effective and less toxic treatments with fewer side effects compared to traditional therapies. Additionally, targeted therapy may be effective for cancers that are resistant to other treatments or have limited treatment options available.

How does life change after Targeted Therapy?

Life after targeted therapy can vary depending on the type of cancer, stage of treatment, and individual response to therapy. For some individuals, targeted therapy may result in long-term remission or stabilization of the disease, allowing them to resume normal activities and enjoy a better quality of life. However, for others, targeted therapy may be a part of ongoing treatment to manage cancer as a chronic condition. Overall, targeted therapy offers hope for improved outcomes and a better quality of life for many cancer patients, with ongoing research and advancements expanding its potential benefits.

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Stereotactic Radiation

Stereotactic Radiation, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), is a precise and highly targeted form of radiation therapy used to treat tumours and other medical conditions with extreme accuracy. It delivers high doses of radiation to a specific target area while minimizing radiation exposure to surrounding healthy tissues.

When and why do people go for Stereotactic Radiation?

People undergo stereotactic radiation when they have tumours or other medical conditions that require precise and targeted treatment. Stereotactic radiation is commonly used to treat tumours in the brain, spine, lungs, liver, prostate, and other areas of the body where surgical removal may be challenging or risky. It may be recommended for individuals with cancerous tumours, benign tumours, or certain neurological conditions that can be effectively treated with radiation therapy.

What makes Stereotactic Radiation different from other treatment options?

Stereotactic radiation offers several advantages over traditional radiation therapy and other treatment options. Unlike conventional radiation therapy, which delivers radiation in multiple sessions over several weeks, stereotactic radiation delivers high doses of radiation in fewer sessions, often completed within one to five treatments. This precise and targeted approach allows for more effective tumour control while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissues, reducing the risk of side effects and complications. Additionally, stereotactic radiation may be used to treat tumours that are difficult to access or surgically remove, providing a non-invasive alternative to surgery for certain medical conditions.

How does life change after Stereotactic Radiation?

Life after stereotactic radiation can vary depending on the individual's overall health, the location and size of the treated tumour, and the response to treatment. Following stereotactic radiation, many individuals experience improvements in tumour control and symptom relief, leading to a better quality of life. Overall, stereotactic radiation can provide effective and targeted treatment for tumours and other medical conditions, offering hope and improved outcomes for individuals facing cancer or other challenging diagnoses.

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Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses imaging technology to precisely target tumours and deliver radiation with a high degree of accuracy. It combines real-time imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans with radiation therapy to ensure that the radiation is directed precisely at the tumour while sparing nearby healthy tissues.

When and why do people go for Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)?

People undergo Image Guided Radiotherapy when they have cancer or other medical conditions that require precise and targeted radiation treatment. IGRT is commonly used to treat tumours in the brain, head and neck, spine, lungs, prostate, and other areas of the body. It may be recommended for individuals with localized or metastatic cancer, where the goal is to deliver radiation therapy with maximum precision while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissues. IGRT is particularly useful for tumours located near critical organs or structures, where accuracy is crucial to avoid potential side effects and complications.

What makes Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) different from other treatment options?

Image Guided Radiotherapy offers several advantages over traditional radiation therapy and other treatment options. Unlike conventional radiation therapy, which relies on external landmarks to position the patient and deliver radiation, IGRT uses real-time imaging technology to visualize the tumour and surrounding anatomy before and during treatment. This allows for precise targeting of the tumour and adjustments to the radiation beams to account for any changes in the tumour position or size. By ensuring accurate delivery of radiation to the tumour while sparing nearby healthy tissues, IGRT can reduce the risk of side effects and complications associated with radiation therapy.

How does life change after Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)? 

Life after Image Guided Radiotherapy can vary depending on the individual's overall health, the location and size of the treated tumour, and the response to treatment. Following IGRT, many individuals experience improvements in tumour control and symptom relief, leading to a better quality of life. Overall, IGRT can provide effective and targeted treatment for tumours and other medical conditions, offering hope and improved outcomes for individuals facing cancer or other challenging diagnoses.

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4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy

4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy is an advanced technique used in radiation therapy to account for the movement of internal organs, particularly the lungs, due to respiratory motion. It involves real-time imaging and tracking of tumour motion during breathing, allowing for precise delivery of radiation to the tumour while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissues.

When and why do people go for 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy?

People undergo 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy when they have tumours located in areas of the body affected by respiratory motion, such as the lungs or upper abdomen. This technique is commonly used to treat lung cancer, liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, and other tumours that move with breathing. By synchronizing radiation delivery with the patient's breathing cycle, 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy allows for more accurate targeting of the tumour while reducing the risk of radiation exposure to nearby organs and tissues.

What makes 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy different from other treatment options?

4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy offers several advantages over traditional radiation therapy and other treatment options. Unlike conventional radiation therapy, which delivers radiation based on static imaging, 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy uses real-time imaging techniques to track tumour motion during breathing. This allows for precise synchronization of radiation delivery with the patient's respiratory cycle, ensuring that radiation is delivered only when the tumour is in the optimal position. By minimizing radiation exposure to surrounding healthy tissues, 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy reduces the risk of side effects and complications while maximizing tumour control and treatment outcomes.

How does life change after 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy?

Life after 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy can vary depending on the individual's overall health, the location and size of the treated tumour, and the response to treatment. Following this advanced radiation therapy technique, many individuals experience improvements in tumour control and symptom relief, leading to a better quality of life. Overall, 4D Respiratory Motion Gated Radiotherapy can provide effective and targeted treatment for tumours affected by respiratory motion, offering hope and improved outcomes for individuals facing cancer or other challenging diagnoses.

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Rapid Arc Radiotherapy

Rapid Arc Radiotherapy is an innovative and advanced technique used in radiation therapy to deliver precise and targeted radiation treatment to cancerous tumours. It utilizes a sophisticated technology known as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver radiation beams that rotate around the patient's body in a continuous arc while adjusting the intensity of the radiation dose.

When and why do people go for Rapid Arc Radiotherapy?

People undergo Rapid Arc Radiotherapy when they have cancerous tumours that require precise and efficient radiation treatment. This technique is commonly used to treat various types of cancer, including tumours in the brain, head and neck, prostate, lung, breast, and other areas of the body. Rapid Arc Radiotherapy is particularly beneficial for individuals who require high doses of radiation delivered quickly and accurately while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. It is often recommended for patients with localized or metastatic cancer, where the goal is to achieve maximum tumour control and minimize side effects and complications associated with radiation therapy.

What makes Rapid Arc Radiotherapy different from other treatment options?

Rapid Arc Radiotherapy offers several advantages over traditional radiation therapy and other treatment options. Unlike conventional radiation therapy techniques, which deliver radiation in multiple fixed beams or angles, Rapid Arc Radiotherapy utilizes a dynamic and continuous arc of radiation beams that rotate around the patient's body. This allows for more efficient and precise delivery of radiation to the tumour while sparing nearby healthy tissues. Additionally, Rapid Arc Radiotherapy can be completed in fewer treatment sessions compared to conventional radiation therapy, reducing the overall treatment time and inconvenience for patients. By delivering high doses of radiation with increased accuracy and efficiency, Rapid Arc Radiotherapy offers improved treatment outcomes and reduced risk of side effects for individuals with cancer.

How does life change after Rapid Arc Radiotherapy?

Life after Rapid Arc Radiotherapy can vary depending on the individual's overall health, the location and size of the treated tumour, and the response to treatment. Following this advanced radiation therapy technique, many individuals experience improvements in tumour control and symptom relief, leading to a better quality of life. Overall, Rapid Arc Radiotherapy can provide effective and targeted treatment for cancerous tumours, offering hope and improved outcomes for individuals facing cancer or other challenging diagnoses.

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4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT

4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT is a specialized imaging technique used in radiation therapy to account for the movement of internal organs, particularly the lungs, due to respiratory motion. It involves acquiring multiple CT images of the chest or abdomen over the course of the respiratory cycle, allowing for precise visualization and tracking of tumour motion during breathing.

When and why do people go for 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT?

People undergo 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT when they require radiation therapy for tumours located in areas affected by respiratory motion, such as the lungs or upper abdomen. This technique is commonly used to plan and guide radiation treatment for lung cancer, liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, and other tumours that move with breathing. By accurately capturing tumour motion during the respiratory cycle, 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT helps radiation oncologists precisely target the tumour while sparing surrounding healthy tissues.

What makes 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT different from other treatment options?

4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT offers several advantages over traditional imaging techniques and treatment options. Unlike conventional CT imaging, which captures static images of the chest or abdomen, 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT acquires multiple images over the respiratory cycle, allowing for dynamic visualization of tumour motion. This enables radiation oncologists to accurately assess tumour position and movement, ensuring that radiation treatment is delivered only when the tumour is in the optimal position. By incorporating real-time motion information into treatment planning, 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT improves the precision and accuracy of radiation therapy, leading to better treatment outcomes and reduced risk of side effects.

How does life change after 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT?

Life after 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT can vary depending on the individual's overall health, the location and size of the treated tumour, and the response to treatment. Following this advanced imaging technique, many individuals undergo radiation therapy with improved accuracy and precision, leading to better tumour control and symptom relief. Overall, 4D Respiratory Motion Gating - CT plays a crucial role in guiding radiation therapy for tumours affected by respiratory motion, offering hope and improved outcomes for individuals facing cancer or other challenging diagnoses.

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Brachytherapy

Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, is a type of cancer treatment that involves placing radioactive sources directly into or near the tumour site. These radioactive sources emit high-energy radiation that destroys cancer cells while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy can be used to treat various types of cancer, including prostate cancer, cervical cancer, breast cancer, and skin cancer.

When and why do people go for Brachytherapy?

People undergo brachytherapy treatment when they are diagnosed with cancer and their healthcare providers determine that it is an appropriate treatment option based on factors such as the type, location, and stage of the cancer, as well as the individual's overall health and treatment goals. Brachytherapy may be recommended as a primary treatment modality or in combination with other treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, or external beam radiation therapy. It is often chosen for its ability to deliver high doses of radiation directly to the tumour while sparing nearby healthy tissues, resulting in fewer side effects and improved treatment outcomes.

What makes Brachytherapy different from other treatment options?

Brachytherapy treatment differs from other treatment options for cancer, such as surgery or external beam radiation therapy, in that it delivers radiation directly to the tumour site, allowing for higher doses of radiation to be delivered while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. This targeted approach enables more precise tumour targeting and may result in better tumour control and fewer side effects compared to conventional radiation therapy techniques. Additionally, brachytherapy can be performed on an outpatient basis and typically requires fewer treatment sessions, leading to shorter overall treatment durations and faster recovery times.

How does life change after Brachytherapy?

Life after brachytherapy treatment can vary depending on factors such as the type and stage of cancer, the individual's overall health, and their response to treatment. Many people experience relief from cancer symptoms and improvements in quality of life following brachytherapy, as the treatment helps to shrink or eradicate tumours while preserving normal organ function and minimizing side effects. Regular follow-up appointments with healthcare providers are important for monitoring treatment response, detecting any recurrence of cancer, and addressing any lingering side effects or concerns. Overall, brachytherapy can be an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for many cancer patients, offering the potential for improved cancer control and long-term survival.

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Breast Cancer Surgery

Breast Cancer Surgery is a surgical procedure performed to remove cancerous tumours and surrounding tissue from the breast. It is a key component of treatment for breast cancer and may involve various surgical techniques depending on the size and location of the tumour, as well as the stage of cancer.

When and why do people go for Breast Cancer Surgery?

People undergo breast cancer surgery when they are diagnosed with breast cancer or have a high risk of developing the disease. Surgery is typically recommended as part of a comprehensive treatment plan to remove cancerous tissue from the breast and, in some cases, to assess the extent of the cancer and determine the stage of the disease. Breast cancer surgery aims to remove the tumour, reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, and improve long-term outcomes for patients.

What makes Breast Cancer Surgery different from other treatment options?

Breast cancer surgery differs from other treatment options, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and hormone therapy, in that it directly targets and removes cancerous tissue from the breast. While other treatments may be used before or after surgery to shrink tumours, destroy remaining cancer cells, or reduce the risk of recurrence, surgery remains the primary method for physically removing cancer from the body. Breast cancer surgery can be performed using different techniques, including lumpectomy (partial mastectomy), mastectomy (complete removal of the breast), or lymph node removal (sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection), depending on the individual's specific circumstances and treatment goals.

How does life change after Breast Cancer Surgery?

Life after breast cancer surgery can vary depending on the type of surgery performed, the stage of the cancer, and the individual's overall health and well-being. Many women find relief from the removal of cancerous tissue and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. Some common changes after breast cancer surgery include temporary discomfort, swelling, or numbness in the breast area, as well as changes in body image and self-esteem. However, with time and appropriate support, many women adapt to these changes and resume their normal activities, focusing on survivorship and maintaining overall health and well-being.

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Lung Cancer Surgery

Lung cancer surgery is a medical procedure performed to remove cancerous tumours or affected tissue from the lungs. It is a primary treatment option for lung cancer and aims to eradicate cancer cells, improve prognosis, and potentially cure the disease.

When and why do people go for Lung Cancer Surgery?

People undergo lung cancer surgery when they are diagnosed with lung cancer, particularly in cases where the cancer is localized and has not spread extensively to other parts of the body. Surgery is often recommended as the primary treatment for early-stage lung cancer or as part of a multimodal treatment approach for more advanced stages. The goal of lung cancer surgery is to remove the tumour and any surrounding affected tissue, thereby reducing the risk of cancer spreading and improving long-term outcomes for patients.

What makes Lung Cancer Surgery different from other treatment options?

Lung cancer surgery differs from other treatment options for lung cancer, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy, in that it directly targets and removes cancerous tissue from the lungs. While other treatments may be used before or after surgery to shrink tumours, destroy remaining cancer cells, or prevent recurrence, surgery remains a primary treatment modality for potentially curative intent. Lung cancer surgery may involve different techniques, including lobectomy (removal of a lobe of the lung), segmentectomy (removal of a segment of the lung), or wedge resection (removal of a small portion of lung tissue), depending on the size, location, and stage of the cancer. 

How does life change after Lung Cancer Surgery?

Life after lung cancer surgery can vary depending on the extent of surgery, the stage of the cancer, and the individual's overall health and well-being. Patients may experience changes in breathing, exercise tolerance, and overall lung capacity after surgery, which may impact their daily activities and quality of life. With proper rehabilitation, support, and follow-up care, many patients are able to adapt to these changes and resume a fulfilling and active lifestyle after lung cancer surgery. Regular follow-up appointments, monitoring, and ongoing care are essential for managing potential complications, monitoring for recurrence, and supporting long-term recovery after lung cancer surgery.

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Colorectal Cancer Surgery

Colorectal cancer surgery is a surgical procedure performed to remove cancerous tumours or affected tissue from the colon or rectum. It is a primary treatment option for colorectal cancer and aims to remove cancer cells, prevent the spread of the disease, and improve long-term outcomes for patients.

When and why do people go for Colorectal Cancer Surgery?

People undergo colorectal cancer surgery when they are diagnosed with colorectal cancer, particularly in cases where the cancer is localized and has not spread extensively to other parts of the body. Surgery is often recommended as the initial treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer or as part of a multimodal treatment approach for more advanced stages. The goal of colorectal cancer surgery is to remove the tumour and any surrounding affected tissue, thereby reducing the risk of cancer spreading and improving survival rates for patients.

What makes Colorectal Cancer Surgery different from other treatment options?

Colorectal cancer surgery differs from other treatment options for colorectal cancer, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy, in that it directly targets and removes cancerous tissue from the colon or rectum. While other treatments may be used before or after surgery to shrink tumours, destroy remaining cancer cells, or prevent recurrence, surgery remains a primary treatment modality for potentially curative intent. Colorectal cancer surgery may involve different techniques, including segmental resection (removal of a segment of the colon or rectum), colectomy (removal of a portion of the colon), or proctectomy (removal of the rectum), depending on the location, size, and stage of the cancer.

How does life change after Colorectal Cancer Surgery?

Life after colorectal cancer surgery can vary depending on the extent of surgery, the stage of the cancer, and the individual's overall health and well-being. While some patients may experience temporary discomfort, pain, or changes in bowel habits following surgery, many find relief from the removal of cancerous tissue and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. With proper rehabilitation, support, and follow-up care, many patients are able to adapt to these changes and lead fulfilling lives after colorectal cancer surgery. Regular follow-up appointments, monitoring, and ongoing care are essential for managing potential complications, monitoring for recurrence, and supporting long-term recovery after colorectal cancer surgery.

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Prostate Cancer Surgery

Prostate cancer surgery, also known as prostatectomy, is a surgical procedure performed to remove the prostate gland and surrounding tissues affected by prostate cancer. It is a primary treatment option for prostate cancer and aims to remove cancerous cells, prevent the spread of the disease, and improve long-term outcomes for patients.

When and why do people go for Prostate Cancer Surgery?

People undergo prostate cancer surgery when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, particularly in cases where the cancer is localized and has not spread extensively to other parts of the body. Surgery is often recommended as the initial treatment for early-stage prostate cancer or as part of a multimodal treatment approach for more advanced stages. The goal of prostate cancer surgery is to remove the tumour and any surrounding affected tissue, thereby reducing the risk of cancer spreading and improving survival rates for patients.

What makes Prostate Cancer Surgery different from other treatment options?

Prostate cancer surgery differs from other treatment options for prostate cancer, such as radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and active surveillance, in that it directly targets and removes cancerous tissue from the prostate gland. While other treatments may be used to shrink tumours, destroy remaining cancer cells, or slow the progression of the disease, surgery remains a primary treatment modality for potentially curative intent. Prostate cancer surgery may involve different techniques, including radical prostatectomy (removal of the entire prostate gland), robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy, or open prostatectomy, depending on the extent of the cancer and the surgeon's preference.

How does life change after Prostate Cancer Surgery?

Life after prostate cancer surgery can vary depending on the extent of surgery, the stage of the cancer, and the individual's overall health and well-being. While some patients may experience temporary side effects such as urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, or changes in bowel habits following surgery, many find relief from the removal of cancerous tissue and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. Regular follow-up appointments, monitoring, and ongoing care are essential for managing potential complications, monitoring for recurrence, and supporting long-term recovery after prostate cancer surgery.

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Liver Cancer Surgery

Liver cancer surgery, also known as hepatectomy or liver resection, is a surgical procedure performed to remove cancerous tumours or affected portions of the liver. It is a primary treatment option for liver cancer and aims to remove cancer cells, prevent the spread of the disease, and improve long-term outcomes for patients. 

When and why do people go for Liver Cancer Surgery?

People undergo liver cancer surgery when they are diagnosed with liver cancer, particularly in cases where the cancer is localized and has not spread extensively to other parts of the body. Surgery is often recommended as the initial treatment for early-stage liver cancer or as part of a multimodal treatment approach for more advanced stages. The goal of liver cancer surgery is to remove the tumour and any surrounding affected tissue, thereby reducing the risk of cancer spreading and improving survival rates for patients.

What makes Liver Cancer Surgery different from other treatment options?

Liver cancer surgery differs from other treatment options for liver cancer, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and liver transplant, in that it directly targets and removes cancerous tissue from the liver. While other treatments may be used to shrink tumours, destroy remaining cancer cells, or slow the progression of the disease, surgery remains a primary treatment modality for potentially curative intent. Liver cancer surgery may involve different techniques, including partial hepatectomy (removal of a portion of the liver), segmentectomy (removal of a segment of the liver), or lobectomy (removal of an entire lobe of the liver), depending on the extent of the cancer and the surgeon's preference.

How does life change after Liver Cancer Surgery?

Life after liver cancer surgery can vary depending on the extent of surgery, the stage of the cancer, and the individual's overall health and well-being. Many find relief from the removal of cancerous tissue and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. With proper rehabilitation, support, and follow-up care, many patients are able to lead fulfilling lives after liver cancer surgery. Regular follow-up appointments, monitoring, and ongoing care are essential for managing potential complications, monitoring for recurrence, and supporting long-term recovery after liver cancer surgery.

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